Philip Johnson’s Glass House

Househappy —  December 30, 2013 — Leave a comment

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In New Canaan, Connecticut stands a beautiful house with windows as walls. The Glass House is the most notable work of American Architect Philip Johnson who designed and built it along with many other structures in 1949. The house is a National Trust Historic Site preserved as an interpretation of modern architecture, landscape and art.

The Glass House is a little less than 1,800 square feet with a cylindrical brick service core housing a bathroom and hearth. The rest of the house is 360 degree views out the glass windows surrounding the exterior. Johnson chose the land and the location of the house because of his superstitions. He believed that by building his house on the shelf of a hill it would bring good spirits, as they will be intrigued by the hill. Johnson continued to build structures on his 49 acres of land as architectural essays. He even built a guest house, which he deliberately designed to be less than comfortable since he rarely had guests over and didn’t want them to stay more than a couple days. In 2005 Johnson passed away in his sleep at the Glass House. The house is open to visitors for tours around the entire property from May through November.

Sources: NY Times & The Philip Johnson Glass House

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