Archives For April 2015

Today we’re taking inspiration in Henry David Thoreau’s words on libraries, via Brain Pickings.

“The Library is a wilderness of books. The volumes of the Fifteenth, Sixteenth, and Seventeenth Centuries, which lie so near on the shelf, are rarely opened, are effectually forgotten and not implied by our literature and newspapers. When I looked into Purchas’s Pilgrims, it affected me like looking into an impassable swamp, ten feet deep with sphagnum, where the monarchs of the forest, covered with mosses and stretched along the ground, were making haste to become peat. Those old books suggested a certain fertility, an Ohio soil, as if they were making a humus for new literatures to spring in. I heard the bellowing of bullfrogs and the hum of mosquitoes reverberating through the thick embossed covers when I had closed the book. Decayed literature makes the richest of all soils.”

These wise words, combined with a bit of cooler spring weather in the Pacific Northwest over the past few days has us dreaming of curling up with a book in one of these cozy personal libraries featured on Apartment Therapy. Get comfy and enjoy.

Source: Brain Pickings and Apartment Therapy

Of course you are familiar with the basic process of making traditional wooden furniture: grow tree, cut down tree, use wood to build furniture. The problem with this method, according to furniture designer Gavin Munro, is that there is too much energy spent on the process, meaning it is not at all eco-friendly.

And herein lies the inspiration for the British designer’s Full Grown furniture company, whose process utilizes “specially designed plastic frames to mold young willow, oak, ash and sycamore trees into the shape of chairs, tables, frames, or lamps as they’re growing. Once they’ve matured, each tree has morphed into a fully functional furniture item made from a single piece of wood, no sawing or assembling necessary.”

This is all an attempt to get people to “rethink our relationship with trees and time,” and the creator likened the process to “a kind of organic 3D printing that uses air, soil and sunshine as its source material.”

We love the idea behind the furniture, and we think it would be a beautiful addition to any home. See what you think of the results in the pictures below, and find out more on Full Grown’s website.

Source: Fast Company