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When it comes to choosing personal photographs to display in the home, no two people think exactly alike. Some like to adorn their walls with family photos, creating a living reminder of the important people in their lives. Others prefer to have fewer personal photographs on display. At the end of the day there’s no right or wrong answer, there’s only what’s right for you.

Here are some helpful guidelines to keep in mind when hanging personal photos in your home:

Images

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Regardless of where you stand on the topic of more personal photos versus less, it’s important to display the images that are most meaningful to you. This may sound obvious, but you’d be surprised how many people shy away from their favorite photos out of worry for how they’ll be perceived.

This isn’t to suggest that you should put an embarrassing or compromising photo on display for all to see. It simply means that you shouldn’t let fear drive your decision. The whole point is to bring important memories into your daily life, so be sure to display the photographs that do that best.

Materials

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To ensure your photographs not only look great but also age well, it’s important to make sure they are properly printed and framed. This is an area where cutting corners can end up costing you in the long run. There’s a huge variety of printing techniques and papers available, so it’s easy to get overwhelmed. Simply going with inkjet printing on a premium luster paper is your best bet. It’s the most common printing method, and the prints themselves are durable and look terrific. Also be sure to use archival mats that are custom cut for your print. It will not only help to enhance the overall look and feel of your photo, it will help to keep it looking great for a long time to come. And finally, go with a quality moulding for your frame. It’s an important accent piece in your home, and the difference between a ready-made frame and a custom, high quality frame is significant. Feel free to go with either glass or Plexi for the front. Plexi is more durable, but it’s also more costly.

Size

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Today’s digital cameras, even those found on smartphones, are amazingly powerful. In fact, a photo from the current iPhone can be used to make large format prints with no pixelation or blur to speak of. So without this constraint, the focus on size should be on your photographs relationship to its environment. If a framed photo is too large, it will overwhelm the space it’s in. Too small and it will look unnatural.

While the rules aren’t necessarily etched in stone, there are guidelines that will help to ensure your framed photos are in harmony with the rest of your room. The first thing to be aware of is the three-eighths rule. What this means is that the empty space on the wall should be equal to three-eighths the width of the frame. Put another way, simply measure your wall and multiply it by 0.57, and this will be the ideal width for your framed photography. As an example, if your wall is 120 inches wide, the width of your frame should be roughly 68 inches (120 x 0.57). It’s important to note that if, for example, your wall has two windows, and you’re hanging your work in between the two windows, then that’s the distance that you measure (as opposed to the width of the entire wall).

If you’re hanging a frame above a piece of furniture, the three-eighths rule applies, but it’s less rigid. Again, the three-eighths rule would be in relation to the piece of furniture, not the wall itself. And if you’re placing a frame above a fireplace, the width should be roughly equal to the opening of the fireplace (regardless of the width of the mantle).

If you wish to hang multiple pieces as a group, treat all of the framed photographs together as though they were one large piece. Do remember to include the space in between the frames when making your calculation, however. And the space in between the frames should be anywhere from 1-3 inches, with larger pieces spaced slightly further apart.

Height

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The height at which you place your framed photograph is critical. There is a tendency for people to hang their work too high, which creates a disconnect from other furnishings in your room. The frame should be centered at eye level. So, as a rule, the center of the frame should be 58 inches off the ground. (Keep in mind that if the center of the frame is at 58 inches, the hook will be higher.)

When hanging work above furniture, the bottom of the frame should be 6-8 inches above the top of the furniture. This can come into conflict with the 58-inch rule, but it’s important that your art be a natural part of its surroundings. This can be an issue with low, modern furniture. If you run into this, you may want to consider going with a larger frame or a grouping of smaller ones.

While the rules on hanging framed photos in your home aren’t fixed, by following a basic set of guidelines you can go about displaying your framed photography with confidence. This is important because few things contribute to making a house a home like personal photos. They’re a living reminder of the people and experiences that are most important to you.

 Mike Malone is founder of Livestock Framing, an online platform for custom printing and framing digital photos. Follow Livestock Framing on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram.

David joins us after a diverse leadership career with companies ranging from small startups to major enterprises. He succeeds Founder and former CEO, Kevin McCloskey. He has big plans for Househappy and has brought in some exciting new partnerships.

David_Photo

Houshappy CEO, David Maoungian

When considering whether or not a startup will succeed Manougian says he “looks for brand potential, a unique customer experience, a business reason for the company to exist and most of all, the talent level of the people. In the case of Househappy it met and surpassed all these areas, especially the people.”

The primary area Manougian sees as a potential industry disruptor for Househappy is the opportunity to reach the next generation of homebuyers seeking a different experience than what exists today in how they search for, buy and maintain their homes. Househappy is passionate about providing these buyers and homeowners with a more visual and personalized search along with the tools to help them manage the most important purchase most people will make in their lifetime – their home.

To learn more about David and changes at Househappy, Malia Spencer, Reporter at the Portland Business Journal, was kind enough to write about us. Click here to check it out.

Whether you’re searching for a home for yourself or a client, Househappy has everything you need to find the perfect property for you.

“The Codomas” (1943)

“The Codomas” (1943)

Towards the end of his life, Henri Matisse was in poor health, and found his typical painting method too physically taxing. So it was out of necessity that he first started experimenting with paper art. He created shapes with scissors that echoed forms from his paintings, and with the help of assistants, arranged these forms in colorful compositions of paper and gouache.

This work was genius in its simplicity. The focus was on color, shape, and distilling forms to their most elementary level. But despite this simplicity, the pieces all have a powerful sense of movement. Even considering all of his earlier masterpieces, many view Matisse’s cut paper works as some of the the strongest and most lasting of his career.

This body of work is an excellent example of making the best of a bad situation, and doing a lot with a little. It meshes perfectly with one of Househappy’s guiding principals: less is more.

“Henri Matisse: The Cut-Outs” will be on view at Museum of Modern Art in New York through February 8th, 2015.

Matisse at work, in about 1947.

“Composition, Black and Red” (1947)

“Composition, Black and Red” (1947)

Blue Nude II” (1952)

“Blue Nude II” (1952)

“Palmette” (1947)

“Palmette” (1947)

“Two Dancers” (1937-38)

“Two Dancers” (1937-38)

Source: The New Yorker

Big news! We’ve partnered with one of the leading syndicators of real estate listings in the U.S. Now, Househappy features more than 2 million listings worldwide.

As part of our efforts to create the most dynamic and rewarding experience for both agents and buyers, we’ve upgraded a few features and added new ones. Get started today!

Profiles

Dedicated profile pages make it easy for buyers and agents to connect.

Social Tools

Post properties on your favorite social channels with built-in social sharing tools.

Maps

Integrated map feature offers a more thorough search experience by revealing nearby properties.

1. Stand out from the crowd, loud and proud, it’s time to bust a real estate rhyme. (dc.curbed.com)

2. A mini revolution—one in 10 new homes in the city of Portland are considered “tiny.” (treehugger.com)

3. Street style blogs are seriously going to the dogs. And we love it! This is hound style. (wlf-hnd.com)

4. Beatrice Gallilee appointed to a newly created role as curator of architecture and design at the Met. (dezeen.com)

5. A gorgeous Soho dream loft where everything is for sale. (remodelista.com)

6. Has John Travolta been naming IKEA furniture all along? (elledecor.com)

7. In honor of International Women’s Day, Architectural Review put together this comprehensive compendium of women in design. (architectural-review.com)

8. It’s almost the weekend! Time to rock out and head home. (youtube.com)

Last week, Househappy participated as a Start Up Alley exhibitor at Inman News’ Real Estate Connect conference. Here are 5 takeaways from my first trip to Real Estate Connect:

1. “Partnerships” seemed to be one of the overriding themes throughout the conference. Nikki Field from Sotheby’s International Realty demonstrated this best during a panel discussion when she talked about “teams, partnerships, and alliances” and how they can ultimately help a broker or agent sell real estate. More and more, I am seeing real estate professionals embrace this concept and implement it in their daily business with great success.

2. Another trend I heard repeated was the importance of brokers/agents learning to think globally. A significant number of real estate professionals understand the power of advertising their listings to a global market––according to one broker, 73% of their sales last year came from international buyers.

3. Inman’s CEO Summit was one of my favorite experiences at Real Estate Connect. It’s unusual to find a forum in which the heads of industry can come together in such an intimate setting. Not only were there great presentations (including one from The New York Times own Andrew Sorkin), but there was also a cocktail hour immediately following which fostered even better connections within the group. (Plus, as an appreciator of design and architecture, I truly enjoyed getting to check out The New York Times building first hand––see pics below).

4. One of the recurring topics in the real estate industry is leveraging new and relevant tech advances; Start Up Alley provides an opportunity for brokers and agents to preview these options. As an exhibitor, we couldn’t have asked for a better venue in which to introduce Househappy.

5. Overall, a week at Real Estate Connect reinforced my belief that Inman News is vital to the real estate industry. Inman regularly produces forward-thinking content that attracts a high level crowd to their events. To keep the industry moving forward, we need people to continue to address the big issues; Real Estate Connect provides a venue for real estate professionals to discuss relevant topics and encourage each other to push the status quo.

Were you at Real Estate Connect NYC? I’d love to hear what you learned or what your favorite part was! Comment or tweet us @househappyinc.

Also, check out some of the photos from our trip below.

All the best,

Kevin McCloskey
Founder & CEO