Archives For Affordable

P.S. We Love You

Househappy —  March 10, 2014 — 1 Comment

April Fools’ Day can’t come soon enough. No, we’re not pulling a prank—we’re just that excited about the April 1 release of IKEA’s new PS 2014 collection. The Swedish company tapped young creatives from around the globe to design objects that can easily be moved around and used in different ways.

“We’ve chosen to devise a series of products that offer cutting-edge design that remains affordable,” says Peter Klinkert, Project Manager for the IKEA PS collections. “These are multifunctional designer objects that involve us in the design conversation, depending on where we place them and how we use them.”

 

Sometimes, the best way to realize a dream is to think outside the box. The Morrisons had long imagined building a beautiful summer home on their plot of land in the coastal town of Onemana, New Zealand. The only problem was finding the funds to embark on such a huge project—until a long-time friend and builder gave them some unconventional advice. His suggestion? Collaborate with architecture students.

Fast forward 12 months and, with help from students at Auckland’s Unitec Institute of Technology, the Morrisons made their dream of a summer home a reality. The students turned their campus into a prefab manufacturing hub, building the home there before moving to the site. The home is a compact 807 square feet and the design is tailored to their laid-back surfer style. The outdoor spaces take advantage of the idyllic location, including an outdoor shower for rinsing off after a day at the beach.

Source: Dwell

Photos: Simon Devitt

Are you tired of living in big cities with unaffordable housing options? If so, you may want to consider purchasing real estate in one of these 10 most affordable small cities in the United States:

Kokomo, Indiana
Population: 82,849
Median home price: $85,000
Median income: $60,100
Percent of homes sold that are affordable: 96.3%

Springfield, Ohio
Population: 137,206
Median home price: $76,000
Median income: $53,500
Percent of homes sold that are affordable: 93.3%

Monroe, Michigan
Population: 151,048
Median home price: $120,000
Median income: $63,700
Percent of homes sold that are affordable: 93.2%

Vineland, New Jersey
Population: 157,785
Median home price: $131,000
Median income: $68,600
Percent of homes sold that are affordable: 93.2%

Cumberland, Maryland
Population: 101,968
Median home price: $89,000
Median income: $53,300
Percent of homes sold that are affordable: 92.9%

Davenport, Iowa
Population: 382,630
Median home price: $94,000
Median income: $63,100
Percent of homes sold that are affordable: 92.5%

Lima, Ohio
Population: 105,141
Median home price: $85,000
Median income: $54,200
Percent of homes sold that are affordable: 92.5%

Bay City, Michigan
Population: 106,935
Median home price: $75,000
Median income: $56,100
Percent of homes sold that are affordable: 92.1%

Fairbanks, Alaska
Population: 100,272
Median home price: $205,000
Median income: $78,400
Percent of homes sold that are affordable: 92%

Mansfield, Ohio
Population: 122,673
Median home price: $91,000
Median income: $54,600
Percent of homes sold that are affordable: 91%

This article can be found in its original form on CNN Money.

Photo: Springfield, Ohio via Rob Hatfield/Greater Springfield GVB

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To address the current student housing shortage in Johannesburg, South Africa, developers have converted unused grain silos into affordable student accommodations. Property developer citiq created ‘Mill Junction’ by stacking brightly colored shipping containers on top of silos. The height of the final building is nearly forty meters, offering the residents panoramic views of the city’s skyline.

The construction was completed in January and had already reached 1/3 occupancy just a few days after the units became available. In addition to living in a unique building, students benefit from the low prices, as well as study facilities, lounges, libraries, and computer labs.

Check out additional photos of Mill Junction below:

Source: Design Boom, Curbed

Photos: Design Boom

After a year and a half of construction, kayaking instructor and boatbuilder Brian Schulz completed building his home in the woods of Cape Falcon, Oregon for the impressibly low price of $11,000.

Inspired by a brass sink he found at a local recycling center, Schulz used salvaged and sometimes donated materials in order to complete his home on an affordable budget.

“With deep enough pockets a person might be able to duplicate such a structure by writing a large check to a talented builder, but that would risk missing the point entirely,” he said. “Whether or not one believes that turning a log from beside the house into the house itself imbues it with some mystical qualities, it is undeniable that the pursuit of local materials connects more deeply to your landscapes, your neighbors, and yourself. The simple act of searching adds richness to our lives. To reiterate: You meet people, you discover new places, you have adventures, you learn things, and you come home with beams, windows, doors, and shingles.”

Dubbed “The Japanese Forest House,” the design incorporates both rustic western and traditional eastern styles.

Source: My Modern Met

Photos: Brian Schulz

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Described as a “sustainable tiny house kit,” this home is easier to assemble than furniture, believe it or not. The Nomad Micro Home was created by Vancouver architect Ian Kent, and was designed to be so small and lightweight that a buyer can ship it anywhere in the world then put it together using basic carpentry skills.

The base Nomad Micro house kit measures only 10×10 feet and includes a living room, kitchen, upstairs sleeping loft, and costs $25,000. To save space, many of the home’s amenities function with dual purpose; for example, the kitchen shelves also act as stairs to the loft and the entire bathroom serves as the shower stall. Though it is designed as a dwelling for only 1-2 residents, several kits can be assembled together to make a larger home. For an additional cost, buyers can upgrade their home with eco-friendly add-ons like solar energy panels, rainwater collection and grey water treatment systems, and a compost toilet.

Check out the slideshow below for additional photos of the Nomad Micro:

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Sources: Jetson Green and Huffington Post