Archives For art

What is home? It can mean a lot of different things to a lot of different people, and animals. An igloo, a nest, a house, a hive—all variations on “home.”

Portland-based artist Carson Ellis recently released a book called Home, that contains a series of illustrations on the idea of “home” and how much it can vary. Ellis is also married to The Decemberists’ Colin Meloy, and the two collaborated on the hugely-popular Wildwood series.

At Househappy, helping people find home is our whole reason for being, so this book really struck a chord with us. We love these sweet drawings. Take a look.

Source: Brain Pickings

We LOVE this invention. Pon is a pushpin that holds up your artwork using the same tension functionality of a paperclip, without puncturing the paper. Its inventors call it “preventing picture puncture.” Its clever design allows you to display and preserve your favorite items and artwork, then switch them out when you’re ready.

Pon is currently available through their Kickstarter.

Source: Pon

 

“The Codomas” (1943)

“The Codomas” (1943)

Towards the end of his life, Henri Matisse was in poor health, and found his typical painting method too physically taxing. So it was out of necessity that he first started experimenting with paper art. He created shapes with scissors that echoed forms from his paintings, and with the help of assistants, arranged these forms in colorful compositions of paper and gouache.

This work was genius in its simplicity. The focus was on color, shape, and distilling forms to their most elementary level. But despite this simplicity, the pieces all have a powerful sense of movement. Even considering all of his earlier masterpieces, many view Matisse’s cut paper works as some of the the strongest and most lasting of his career.

This body of work is an excellent example of making the best of a bad situation, and doing a lot with a little. It meshes perfectly with one of Househappy’s guiding principals: less is more.

“Henri Matisse: The Cut-Outs” will be on view at Museum of Modern Art in New York through February 8th, 2015.

Matisse at work, in about 1947.

“Composition, Black and Red” (1947)

“Composition, Black and Red” (1947)

Blue Nude II” (1952)

“Blue Nude II” (1952)

“Palmette” (1947)

“Palmette” (1947)

“Two Dancers” (1937-38)

“Two Dancers” (1937-38)

Source: The New Yorker

Who needs artwork when you can draw on the walls?

The “Frames” wallpaper by artists Taylor and Brown has been offering just that for more than a decade. Now, they’ve released three new colorways, for even more customizable looks in pink, black, and gold.

Images: Graham & Brown

Source: Trendir