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David joins us after a diverse leadership career with companies ranging from small startups to major enterprises. He succeeds Founder and former CEO, Kevin McCloskey. He has big plans for Househappy and has brought in some exciting new partnerships.

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Houshappy CEO, David Maoungian

When considering whether or not a startup will succeed Manougian says he “looks for brand potential, a unique customer experience, a business reason for the company to exist and most of all, the talent level of the people. In the case of Househappy it met and surpassed all these areas, especially the people.”

The primary area Manougian sees as a potential industry disruptor for Househappy is the opportunity to reach the next generation of homebuyers seeking a different experience than what exists today in how they search for, buy and maintain their homes. Househappy is passionate about providing these buyers and homeowners with a more visual and personalized search along with the tools to help them manage the most important purchase most people will make in their lifetime – their home.

To learn more about David and changes at Househappy, Malia Spencer, Reporter at the Portland Business Journal, was kind enough to write about us. Click here to check it out.

You get to work in the morning, open your inbox, and there it is…. hundreds of unread emails.

If this sounds familiar, you’re not alone. In a world where communication––whether long distance or from an office down the hall––is essentially free, we have become inundated with messages with no way to stop it.

According to a recent study by technology and market research firm Radicati Group, people around the world send up to 182 billion emails everyday and 67 trillion emails a year, and this number is only growing. The number of active email accounts grew from 3.3 billion in 2012 to 3.9 billion last year, and is expected to grow by 6% in each of the next four years.

What was invented as a convenience has gradually become an impediment or distraction. In fact, Clive Thompson, author of “Smarter Than You Think: How Technology is Changing Our Minds for the Better,” believes that email has actually become a barrier to productivity and efficiency in the workplace.

“You make it easy for people to do something, they will do more of it,” Thompson said. “People feel the need to include 10 other people on an email just to let them know they are being productive at work. But as a result, it ends up making those other 10 people unproductive because they have to manage that email.”

While many startups including Mailbox, Xobni, and Sparrow, have invented various smart-mailboxes in an attempt to solve this issue, many are considering a more extreme option to resolve their over-emailed existence––declare email bankruptcy. Simply select all and hit delete.

Is email still your primary form of communication at work? How do you deal when your inbox begins to pile up?

This article can be found in its original form on The New York Times

Image: Shutterstock

mortgage-rates16New federal regulations requiring lenders to verify an applicant’s ability to repay may make it more difficult for borrowers who are self-employed to obtain a mortgage. The rules, created by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, set standards for mortgages that are considered low-risk for both parties.

Effective this month, lenders are now required to verify a borrower’s income and confirm a debt-to-income ratio of 43% or less. Borrowers who are self-employed or own their own business will find their incomes being analyzed in greater detail.

According to Peter Grabel, a loan originator at Luxury Mortgage, in Stamford, Connecticut, borrowers who have been self-employed for less than two years will find it nearly impossible to obtain financing without sufficient business tax returns.

“[Lenders] must establish the stability and continuity of the income source,” he said. “The problem for self-employed people is that they want to minimize their tax liability, but some of the ways they do so impact their ability to borrow.”

This article can be found in its original form at The New York Times.