Archives For Construction

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It’s that time of year. You’re probably starting to think a vacation somewhere warm sounds pretty good right about now. Well, we hear you. That’s why we want to share these incredibly beautiful photographs, to send you on a virtual vacation to the magical mists of Kauai, where photographer Jess Bianchi documented the construction of The Kauai Cottage, an off-the-grid Hawaiian hideaway.

Built and designed by San Francisco artist and surfer Jay Nelson, the philosophy behind the project was to encourage residents of the cabin to “live simply and small and only use what you need,” according to Jess. “In a time of excess when everyone seems to be building bigger and higher, we wanted to experiment with a simpler kind of living.” And at only 200 square feet, it is certainly less living space than most people are used to. But the detail and care that went into crafting the reclaimed redwood structure is evident in every inch, and the natural beauty surrounding the structure is truly inspiring. Plus there’s no TV to distract or take you out of the moment, and you can pick fruit right off the front porch! Isn’t that pretty much the definition of paradise?

If this sounds like a place you need to visit for real, and not just look at on the internet, we have good news: the owners are currently discussing the possibility of opening the cottage to the public in the near future, and have plans to add solar panels, a garden, and possibly build another structure on the property. Until then, take a look at the photos below and drift away on an imagination vacation. Aloha!

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Source: Jess Bianchi

The United Nations projects that by 2050, there will be 9.2 billion humans on earth. To solve the impending predicament of where we are going to house all those people, USC professor Behrokh Khoshnevis has come up with the concept for a massive 3D printer capable of creating an entire 2,500 square foot home––in just 24 hours.

Professor Khoshnevis designed a printer with two crane-like arms and a crossbeam to hold a printhead that dispenses super quick drying cement. Though the printer could create the structure of a home, construction workers would still be needed to prep the space, lay down foundation, install window head jambs, and insert a metal ceiling between the floors, along with other finishing touches.

Can you imagine building your dream home in a single day?

Source: Dvice

Image: Dvice

With $2 million raised in seed money, New York based startup Architizer aims to make architecture and interiors accessible to everyone. Though they are currently the largest platform for architecture and design online hosting projects with user-uploaded content, according to their chief executive and cofounder Marc Kushner, this latest round of capital will allow them to go after a $200 billion global construction supplies market.

Architizer––which cites Houzz and McGraw Hill as its primary competitors––allows firms to post photos, videos, and project details, then charges construction suppliers a varying monthly fee to link with builders and products.

“Manufacturers are desperate to get their products online,” Kushner said. “Architects from all over the world are telling us ‘Man, you guys have something going on.'”

This article can be found in its original form on Venture Beat.

Photo: Architizer

medium_e5334f5e-cc6a-409e-bf04-0d845d7f0021Remodeling spending is expected to jump in 2014 as the housing market steadies and homeowners begin to look at adding value to their homes. The following five areas are where homeowners are expected to spend the most remodeling dollars this year:

Bathrooms: An updated bathroom can be a huge advantage when selling a home. Furthermore, remodeling a bathroom is often one of the less expensive rooms to make over. Homeowners are likely to recoup 72.5% of the cost at resale according to Remodeling Magazine’s annual Cost vs. Value report.

Kitchens: Even a minor kitchen remodel (replacement of cabinet fronts, oven and cooktop, countertops, sink and faucet, and flooring) is shown to recoup 82.7% at resale.

Exterior Updates: After kitchens and baths, landscaping projects are high on the remodeling list for homeowners, said Liza Hausman, Houzz’s Vice President of Community. Many people choose to create outdoor entertainment spaces to add more usable square footage to their existing home.

Age-in-place improvements: Remodeling the first floor to create a master bedroom and bath is a common way for retirees to reconfiguring their space to prepare for the years ahead.

Additions: Adding on a family room, expanding the kitchen, or building a master suite are all more expensive projects and will be lucrative for contractors and designers in 2014. Large additions were shown to recoup 68.8% of their cost at resale.

This article can be found in its original form on MarketWatch.

Photo: Househappy.org

After a year and a half of construction, kayaking instructor and boatbuilder Brian Schulz completed building his home in the woods of Cape Falcon, Oregon for the impressibly low price of $11,000.

Inspired by a brass sink he found at a local recycling center, Schulz used salvaged and sometimes donated materials in order to complete his home on an affordable budget.

“With deep enough pockets a person might be able to duplicate such a structure by writing a large check to a talented builder, but that would risk missing the point entirely,” he said. “Whether or not one believes that turning a log from beside the house into the house itself imbues it with some mystical qualities, it is undeniable that the pursuit of local materials connects more deeply to your landscapes, your neighbors, and yourself. The simple act of searching adds richness to our lives. To reiterate: You meet people, you discover new places, you have adventures, you learn things, and you come home with beams, windows, doors, and shingles.”

Dubbed “The Japanese Forest House,” the design incorporates both rustic western and traditional eastern styles.

Source: My Modern Met

Photos: Brian Schulz

Recent reports show that U.S. housing starts were up 22.7% in November, reaching its highest level in nearly six years. Data shows the housing industry adjusting to the rise in mortgage rates, steady job-market gains, and rising stock and housing wealth, which can boost the confidence levels of prospective buyers and may account for this new momentum.

“The recovery trend has resumed,” said Alan Levenson, chief economist at T. Rowe Price Associates.

A stronger housing market lends itself to growth in other areas as well––including job creation, demand for building materials, and an increase in the sales of home goods––making these latest reports good news for the wider economy.

This article can be found in its original form at Wall Street Journal

 

Construction, or assembly rather, has begun on the new ‘N’Habit: Belltown apartments. Whereas building a traditional apartment complex can take years, the new 49-unit building is expected to be complete in just 7 months thanks to modular development.

Before being craned into place, each unit was pre-assembled in a factory (a process that only takes 10-11 days per unit) and arrived complete with plumbing, wiring, fixtures, cabinets, appliances, and floor coverings.

“Similar to how manufacturing-based efficiencies advanced the aerospace and automotive industries, modular construction is setting a new standard in the development industry as the better way to build,” the ‘N’Habit website explains.

Sources: Curbed, SeattlePI

Photos: Charter Construction.