Archives For Decor

When it comes to choosing personal photographs to display in the home, no two people think exactly alike. Some like to adorn their walls with family photos, creating a living reminder of the important people in their lives. Others prefer to have fewer personal photographs on display. At the end of the day there’s no right or wrong answer, there’s only what’s right for you.

Here are some helpful guidelines to keep in mind when hanging personal photos in your home:

Images

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Regardless of where you stand on the topic of more personal photos versus less, it’s important to display the images that are most meaningful to you. This may sound obvious, but you’d be surprised how many people shy away from their favorite photos out of worry for how they’ll be perceived.

This isn’t to suggest that you should put an embarrassing or compromising photo on display for all to see. It simply means that you shouldn’t let fear drive your decision. The whole point is to bring important memories into your daily life, so be sure to display the photographs that do that best.

Materials

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To ensure your photographs not only look great but also age well, it’s important to make sure they are properly printed and framed. This is an area where cutting corners can end up costing you in the long run. There’s a huge variety of printing techniques and papers available, so it’s easy to get overwhelmed. Simply going with inkjet printing on a premium luster paper is your best bet. It’s the most common printing method, and the prints themselves are durable and look terrific. Also be sure to use archival mats that are custom cut for your print. It will not only help to enhance the overall look and feel of your photo, it will help to keep it looking great for a long time to come. And finally, go with a quality moulding for your frame. It’s an important accent piece in your home, and the difference between a ready-made frame and a custom, high quality frame is significant. Feel free to go with either glass or Plexi for the front. Plexi is more durable, but it’s also more costly.

Size

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Today’s digital cameras, even those found on smartphones, are amazingly powerful. In fact, a photo from the current iPhone can be used to make large format prints with no pixelation or blur to speak of. So without this constraint, the focus on size should be on your photographs relationship to its environment. If a framed photo is too large, it will overwhelm the space it’s in. Too small and it will look unnatural.

While the rules aren’t necessarily etched in stone, there are guidelines that will help to ensure your framed photos are in harmony with the rest of your room. The first thing to be aware of is the three-eighths rule. What this means is that the empty space on the wall should be equal to three-eighths the width of the frame. Put another way, simply measure your wall and multiply it by 0.57, and this will be the ideal width for your framed photography. As an example, if your wall is 120 inches wide, the width of your frame should be roughly 68 inches (120 x 0.57). It’s important to note that if, for example, your wall has two windows, and you’re hanging your work in between the two windows, then that’s the distance that you measure (as opposed to the width of the entire wall).

If you’re hanging a frame above a piece of furniture, the three-eighths rule applies, but it’s less rigid. Again, the three-eighths rule would be in relation to the piece of furniture, not the wall itself. And if you’re placing a frame above a fireplace, the width should be roughly equal to the opening of the fireplace (regardless of the width of the mantle).

If you wish to hang multiple pieces as a group, treat all of the framed photographs together as though they were one large piece. Do remember to include the space in between the frames when making your calculation, however. And the space in between the frames should be anywhere from 1-3 inches, with larger pieces spaced slightly further apart.

Height

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The height at which you place your framed photograph is critical. There is a tendency for people to hang their work too high, which creates a disconnect from other furnishings in your room. The frame should be centered at eye level. So, as a rule, the center of the frame should be 58 inches off the ground. (Keep in mind that if the center of the frame is at 58 inches, the hook will be higher.)

When hanging work above furniture, the bottom of the frame should be 6-8 inches above the top of the furniture. This can come into conflict with the 58-inch rule, but it’s important that your art be a natural part of its surroundings. This can be an issue with low, modern furniture. If you run into this, you may want to consider going with a larger frame or a grouping of smaller ones.

While the rules on hanging framed photos in your home aren’t fixed, by following a basic set of guidelines you can go about displaying your framed photography with confidence. This is important because few things contribute to making a house a home like personal photos. They’re a living reminder of the people and experiences that are most important to you.

 Mike Malone is founder of Livestock Framing, an online platform for custom printing and framing digital photos. Follow Livestock Framing on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram.

Today we’re taking inspiration in Henry David Thoreau’s words on libraries, via Brain Pickings.

“The Library is a wilderness of books. The volumes of the Fifteenth, Sixteenth, and Seventeenth Centuries, which lie so near on the shelf, are rarely opened, are effectually forgotten and not implied by our literature and newspapers. When I looked into Purchas’s Pilgrims, it affected me like looking into an impassable swamp, ten feet deep with sphagnum, where the monarchs of the forest, covered with mosses and stretched along the ground, were making haste to become peat. Those old books suggested a certain fertility, an Ohio soil, as if they were making a humus for new literatures to spring in. I heard the bellowing of bullfrogs and the hum of mosquitoes reverberating through the thick embossed covers when I had closed the book. Decayed literature makes the richest of all soils.”

These wise words, combined with a bit of cooler spring weather in the Pacific Northwest over the past few days has us dreaming of curling up with a book in one of these cozy personal libraries featured on Apartment Therapy. Get comfy and enjoy.

Source: Brain Pickings and Apartment Therapy

We LOVE this invention. Pon is a pushpin that holds up your artwork using the same tension functionality of a paperclip, without puncturing the paper. Its inventors call it “preventing picture puncture.” Its clever design allows you to display and preserve your favorite items and artwork, then switch them out when you’re ready.

Pon is currently available through their Kickstarter.

Source: Pon

 

Modern or traditional? Designer or DIY? Wacky and whimsical, or subtle and minimal? Whatever your style, there’s a wreath to match. The New York Times recently went wreath shopping with Kevin Hertzog, a freelance set designer and prop stylist who once worked on Bergdorf Goodman’s famous holiday displays, so he knows a thing or two about wreaths. You’ll find a few of our favorites below. See any that would look good on your door?

Wreaths__Holidays_in_the_Round_7-_NYTimes_com

Wreaths__Holidays_in_the_Round_6-_NYTimes_com

Source: The New York Times

2014 has been a big year for brass in home decor, though it’s by no means a new concept. Once a norm in houses around the world, at some point brass just fell out of favor. Some homeowners became so disdainful of it that they would go so far as to paint over brass light fixtures and nobs. But brass is back in a big way (although we are not talking about the ultra-shiny brass of the 80s), and the trend doesn’t seem to be going anywhere soon. The brass of today is all about creating a warm and timeless look, but with a fresh modern twist.

Design*Sponge believes brass’ appeal may be due in part to the fact that it looks good at any level of wear. Brand new is beautiful, but many years in it develops a gorgeous surface patina of wear that many prefer to its original shine. We think it’s safe to say that the brass revival is more than a fad at this point.

In hopes of inspiring you to experiment with using brass in your own home, we’ve rounded up a few of our favorite brass products and uses in decor below. See what you think! Would you install brass in your own home?

Oak and brass shelving system featured on Remodelista.

 

This Hexagon towel holder by Urban Outfitters.

 

A DIY dresser revamp with antique brass bamboo handles, feautured on the blog Natty By Design.

 

This modern yet classic bathroom featured on Domino.

 

This midcentury sconce by Schoolhouse Electric.

 

Sources: Design*SpongeRemodelistaUrban OutfittersNatty By DesignDominoSchoolhouse Electric.

Sure, at this point in your holiday meal prep, the focus may be on food. Between making your grocery list, organizing ingredients, and planning out your day-of oven schedule, it’s easy to forget about setting your holiday table. But David at Another Decor Blog reminds us not to neglect that holiday table essential, the Thanksgiving centerpiece.

Centerpieces have graced tables on special occasions for thousands of years. In Roman times, tables were decorated with natural materials like leaves and branches. In the middle ages, decorative marzipan figurines were a popular choice for holiday tablescapes. 18th century centerpieces frequently incorporated a mirror, to reflect the bounty of food, flowers, and candles on the table.

Centerpiece trends today are broad and varied, so the choice is up to you to pick what best matches your home and style, but many experts feel it’s based to stick to the basics, such as natural materials like gourds and flowers. So take a look at these beautiful ideas for some inspiration, and then get to work on some of your own!

Source: Another Decor Blog 

When it comes to Halloween DIYs, whether costume, decor, or entertaining in nature, it must be acknowledged that Martha Stewart is the one true master of the holiday. Need proof? Look through this rundown of Martha’s Halloween costumes throughout the years. Impressive, to say the least.

If you need last-minute dress up ideas, spooky cocktails and hors d’oeuvres, or just want to perk up your porch before the trick-or-treaters come knocking, we suggest going straight to the source. To save you some time, we’ve found a few favorites below that will instantly improve your Halloween. Happy haunting!

Cast a shadow with some spooky silhouettes:

Going to a party? Pick up glue, glasses, and plastic insects and your costume is covered:

Whip up some creepy cocktails for your Halloween happy hour:

Take your porch from standard to scary with these hanging paper bats:

Source: Martha Stewart Living