Archives For Google

Last week, Samsung introduced their new Smart Home app to the world, now Google is getting in on the ‘connected home’ action. On Monday, the company announced that they will be purchasing Nest, maker of smart thermostat and smoke detectors, for the bargain price of $3.2 billion dollars.

Nest was launched in 2011 with the mission to “reinvent unloved but important devices in the home,” and has since raised around $80 million from investors including Shasta Ventures, Kleiner Perkins, and Google Ventures.

“Nest’s founders, Tony Fadell and Matt Rogers, have built a tremendous team that we are excited to welcome into the Google family,” said Google CEO Larry Page. “They’re already delivering amazing products you can buy right now––thermostats that save energy and smoke/CO alarms that can help keep your family safe. We are excited to bring great experiences to more homes in more countries and fulfill their dreams!”

After the transaction is complete (it is expected to close in the next few months), Nest will continue to operate under the direction of CEO Tony Fadell, previously known for leading the development of Apple’s iPod.

“We’re thrilled to join Google,” he said. “With their support, Nest will be even better placed to build simple, thoughtful devices that make life easier at home, and that have a positive impact on the world.”

This latest purchase is further evidence that companies are looking at the ‘connected home’ as one of the next big things in technology.

Source: Google, Venture Beat

Web Summit 2013, Europe’s largest tech conference, will take place on October 30 and 31 in Dublin, Ireland and Househappy will be there!

With over 10,000 attendees, Web Summit is a global gathering of the world’s leading thinkers and doers in technology. This year’s sold out Summit will feature more than 350 speakers ranging from founders, investors, CEOs, inventors, and designers. Big names include Drew Houston, co-founder and CEO of Dropbox; Phil Libin, CEO of Evernote; Kevin Rose, Digg founder and Google Ventures VC; and skateboarder turned CEO, Tony Hawk.

Househappy is one of 150 startups invited to attend the Summit’s 2.5 day STARTglobal event––what Forbes is calling “the new hot ticket on the tech conference scene.”

The event is described as “an annual gathering of…the world’s most exciting and disruptive startups.” Among last year’s invitees were Vine, Mailbox, Stripe, Waze, and Coursera.

Househappy is honored to be in such great company and we are beyond excited to be part of this year’s STARTglobal. We will also have a premium exhibition stand at the Summit, so come find us and say hello!

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Who rules your “Internet Empire”?

Mark Graham and Stefano De Stabbata, researchers at the Oxford Internet Institute, have created a map to help you answer this very question. By resizing each nation to reflect the number of Internet users and displaying their most popular website, the map provides a geographical look at the global internet sovereigns.

While Facebook comes in second, it is clear that Google reigns supreme as the most popular site in North America, Europe, and parts of south Asia.

“The power of Google on the Internet becomes starkly evident if we also look at the second most visited website in every country,” Graham and De Stabbata write. “Among the 50 countries that have Facebook listed as the most visited visited website, 36 of them have Google as the second most visited, and the remaining 14 countries list YouTube (currently owned by Google).”

In order of popularity, the most visited websites per country are as listed:

  1. Google
  2. Facebook
  3. Baidu
  4. Yahoo!
  5. AlWatan Voice
  6. Mail.ru
  7. VK
  8. Yandex

But why does this matter?

According to Graham and Stabbata, this data may be more significant than we realize:

We are likely still in the very beginning of the Age of Internet Empires. But, it may well be that the territories carved out now will have important implications for which companies end up controlling how we communicate and access information for many years to come.

This article can be found in its original form at The Atlantic