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With spring break just around the corner, we’ve been dreaming of our ideal getaway. This contemporary villa in Spain tops the list. In fact, we wouldn’t be surprised if you booked a one-way ticket—and never looked back.

Situated near the shops, marina, and restaurants in Mallorca’s tony Puerto Portals, this architect-designed home offers two floors of spacious living areas. The ground floor includes four bedrooms and three bathrooms, as well as a studio/library. The first floor features a Bulthaup kitchen and generous indoor-outdoor living spaces with sweeping views of the Mediterranean. Details and finishes were all thoughtfully sourced, from Italian lighting to a Jacuzzi with a self-cleaning, saltwater electrolysis system.

Costa D’En Blanes is listed by Maria Vega and is on the market for $4,736,771.

Find more details about this property on Househappy.org.

Augusta by William Lyon Builder's has all of the details of toda

Home for sale via Househappy

Real estate analysts have predicted that 2014 will be the year for sellers; so if you’re waiting to sell your home, you may want to reconsider.

In November, housing prices were up 7.2% from a year prior and the highest since August of 2008, according to the National Association of Realtors. In the 20 largest metro areas prices in October increased sizably. The economic recovery is finally picking up since the housing bust seven years ago. Sellers are finding that they have more room for negotiating as more buyers are entering the market due to drops in the unemployment rate and the increase in consumer confidence.

As mortgage rates are rising pushing home prices up, the amount of for-sale listings are limited. These are some of the factors that come with a sellers market. With limited homes on the market some buyers fear that they won’t be able to find their perfect home.

Buyers are now snatching up properties faster. In November 2013 homes were selling 11% faster than the previous year. In some cities such as New York, homes were selling 20% faster.

Beyond 2014 though, more homes are expected to hit the market. Some analysts say that the supply-demand imbalance that has helped create this seller’s market is largely due to investment firms and others who are purchasing large numbers of homes to turn into rentals.

This article can be found in its original form on MarketWatch.  

Home for sale via Househappy.org

2013 was a year of highs and lows in the housing market, so what should we be looking for in the year ahead? According to the Wall Street Journal, here are 5 “wild cards to watch” in 2014:

Will inventory rise? 

Though evidence shows that inventories likely bottomed out in 2013 and many markets are moving in favor of buyers, inventory numbers will remain tight. Contributing factors: foreclosure-related listings have fallen, traditional buyers still aren’t listing homes in high numbers, and new construction will take years to return to normal levels.

Where is the home-construction recovery? 

While home prices have begun to recover, they are still too low to justify the land, labor, and materials costs in new construction. Contributing factors: credit is harder to come by for smaller builders, and move-up buyers don’t have enough equity to “trade up” to a new home.

What happens to mortgage credit? 

Mortgages may be easier to come by but borrowing costs and fees could rise. Contributing factors: lenders could begin to ease certain “overlays” (additional credit and documentation checks) that have been imposed over the past few years, and mortgage insurance companies are getting more comfortable issuing loans with down payments of just 5%; however, banks may get more cautious as they face new mortgage regulations, and borrowers with hard-to-document incomes (anyone who is self employed or works on commission, bonuses, etc.) could continue to have a difficult time.

What will investors do with their homes? 

Investors have played a key role in stabilizing home prices in the past few years as they purchased tens of thousands of homes, particularly in regions that were hit hardest by foreclosures. Now that this rush to invest is dying down, more lenders and investors are extending debt financing to property owners to help boost returns.

When does housing hit a tipping point on affordability? 

Though rising prices are giving many homeowners equity in their homes again, price inflation is also making housing less affordable. This will become a bigger problem if cash buyers retreat from the market in 2014 and/or if interest rates rise significantly.

This article can be found in its original form on Wall Street Journal

Househappy headquarters in Portland, Oregon’s Pearl District

Househappy is very excited to announce that we have secured an additional $1.5 million in series A financing led by Jeff Greenberg, Senior VP Electronic Media and Director at Skechers.

“I could not be more proud of the progress we have made in the 7 months since our launch,” said Kevin McCloskey, our CEO/founder. “Our team has been working hard to build a product that we believe in. This new round of funding will allow us to maintain that forward momentum and continue building.”

The capital is in addition to the $1 million seed round Househappy.org received previously from angel investors. It will be used to expand our growing team and further development of our products and services for buyers, brokers, and sellers.

In addition to his position with Skechers, Mr. Greenberg is the founder of G9 development, a luxury real estate development company located in Manhattan Beach, CA. He will also serve on Househappy’s board of directors.

“In our line of work, we are constantly using real estate search platforms,” he said. “When I was introduced to Househappy, I felt like it provided solutions to a lot of what was missing from the existing sites…I expect big things from Househappy and I am looking forward to being a part of it.”

For additional information, please see our press release

GM Building

General Motors Building, Manhattan (Mario Tama/Getty Images via NPR)

Manhattan’s General Motors Building is a 50-story marble wonder, occupying a full city block at 5th Avenue and 59th Street. Considered one of the most valuable office towers in the United States, a large piece of the GM Building was purchased by a Chinese developer in May 2013––the latest example of how the U.S. real estate market is heating up for Asian investors.

From Park Avenue Plaza to the U.S. Bank Building, Asian investors are purchasing premier properties from New York to Los Angeles including office towers, luxury hotels, and high-street retail. According to Dan Fasulo, the managing director of Real Capital Analytics, foreign investment from Asian countries has totaled about $7 billion in 2013 so far, already almost doubling last year’s total of $4.3 billion.

For many, this surge is reminiscent of the late ’80’s, when Japanese investors made a succession of high-profile, inflated purchases from Rockefeller Center to Pebble Beach Golf Course, and were subsequently hit with big losses as the market crumbled soon after. But this new wave of investors have done their homework, says Christopher Ludeman, head of Global Capital Markets at CBRE Group.

The Chinese in particular do a tremendous amount of research and are careful investors, he says. This new wave is mindful of the Japanese experience but ultimately they are investors flush with cash who are ready to diversify––and the U.S. market is looking pretty good.

This article can be found in its original form at NPR.org