Archives For Lighting

Finding high-quality simply-designed home fixtures is harder than you might think. For this reason, Belgian architect Eve van Dyck’s lighting line Zangra has become a cult favorite among European design buffs. Now her clean and simple pieces will finally be available stateside. Remodelista tipped us off to the newly North America–compatible porcelain and glass fixtures, and we’re excited to spread the word.

Source: Remodelista

Thunder only happens when it’s raining. (Right?)

Unless it’s artist Richard Clarkson’s “Cloud” lighting fixture, an interactive piece that simulates a thunderstorm. Flickering light and sound changes based on external input from either a remote control or motion sensors. You can see more at Colossal or on Clarkson’s site.

Source: Colossal

Looking to liven up and lighten up your space? Homes & Hues recently featured some unique and whimsical lighting alternatives to replace your boring old lamp. Here are some of our favorites:

Starry Light––These lights are drilled with tiny holes to feature real constellations and turn any room into a beautiful night sky.

The Moon––Use as a compliment to your stars or as a subtle glowing light on its own, this moon light is sure to bring some romance to your space.

Skirting Board Sunset––This playful floor lamp designed by Helmut Smits has an adjustable glow to turn any room into a warm sunset.

The Light Drop––A light with a message, this Rafael Morgan design is intended to remind the user to be conscious about their electricity usage as well as their water consumption.

Balloon Lamp––Using a high intensity LED light inside a thicker-than-normal balloon, this Kouichi Okamoto designed light could add the perfect amount of whimsy to a child’s room.

This post can be found in its original form on Homes and Hues

Photos: Homes and Hues

Homebuyers know that finding the right property can sometimes feel like an overwhelming process with an incredible number of things to consider––location, square footage, number of rooms, backyard. And while we’ve already addressed the things you should check before buying a home, to make the process a little easier, here are 5 things NOT to worry about while house hunting:

1. Paint color––If your style is simple and classic, it can be difficult to envision yourself in a home with a purple kitchen; however, it’s important to remember that the color of the walls is one of the cheapest and easiest changes to make in a home.

2. Furniture/Style––Keep in mind that a home’s decor is only temporary and will be leaving with the previous owners. Do your best to imagine the home as a blank slate.

3. Architectural details (or lack thereof)––Does that wood paneling make you feel like you’re in a hunting lodge? Or have you always dreamed of crown molding? Though you might assume these details can make or break a property, they are actually quite easy to add or remove.

4. Light––Nothing is less home-y feeling than walking in to a dark, cave-like space; but before you dismiss a home completely, consider what small changes you could make to add some light. Are there trees or bushes blocking the windows? Are the windows too small for the room?

5. Current layout––Try to look past how the current owner is using a particular space and look at the bones of the room. Maybe you don’t throw a lot of dinner parties but could really use a family room––consider changing that dining room into your den. Or perhaps that extra bedroom would make a great home office.

This post can be found in its original form on Apartment Therapy

Photos: Househappy.org

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Studies show that right environment can make a big difference in productivity, and companies generally keep this in mind when designing their employees’ workspace. Mashable recently published a list of design tips for a more productive office; which has us wondering: Why not apply some of these same recommendations when designing our offices at home?

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1. Ergonomics. 

The logic is simple––if you’re back is killing you or your neck is stiff, you’re not going to get much work done. Fortunately, the fix is equally simple: adjust. Focus on the height of your chair and desk, and the angle of your computer monitor.

2. Lose the clutter. 

Clean, clutter-free workspaces can increase productivity––plus you will spend less time searching for things if you’re organized. Consider developing a filing system for both hard copies and digital documents. And always, always back up your work.

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3. Add some color. 

According to color psychologist Angela Wright, certain colors tend to have the same universal effect on people. Blue stimulates the mind, yellow inspires creativity, red affects your body, and green creates calming balance. Don’t forget to pay attention to the intensity of your color choice: highly saturated, bright colors will stimulate while softer, muted colors are soothing.

4. Get one with nature. 

Two recent studies have found that having a plant at your desk or near your workspace can increase cognitive attention and productivity––not to mention make your air more breathable!

5. Light it up. 

A well lit space can do wonders for how well you work. Natural light from windows and skylights is ideal; however, if this isn’t an option in your space, opt for indirect light rather than overhead.

Source: Mashable

Photos: Adorable Home, Houzz