Archives For Manhattan

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50 Gramercy Park N New York, NY, via Househappy.org

This pre-war penthouse, built in 1924, was converted by renowned London-based architect John Pawson. With 3 bedrooms and 3.5 bathrooms, the apartment combines luxury with Pawson’s purist, minimal design aesthetic to create an understated opulence.

The 4,235 square foot apartment occupies two full floors and is located in Manhattan’s coveted Gramercy Park, the only private park in New York City. The lower 17th floor includes an entry gallery leading to a great room, a library with a wood burning fireplace, and a formal dining room––all with southern exposure and magnificent Gramercy Park views. This floor also has a media room, two bedrooms with ensuite bathrooms, a powder room, and a gourmet eat-in kitchen with northern views of the Chrysler Building. A winding staircase takes you to the top-floor master bedroom suite, a home office, and two private terraces.

This home was originally listed for $18.9 million in 2012 and dropped 11% a month later to $16.9 million; it is now on the market for the bargain price of $14.9 million. 50 Gramercy Park N New York, New York is listed by Tim Cass with the Corcoran Group.

This property post can be found in its original form by clicking here, or view complete gallery below.

One idea depicts a jutting ridge drilled through with a pedestrian tunnel in Helsinki’s Senate Square.

Snow is great for skiing, snowball fights, building snowmen, and cabin getaways––not so great for city living. Regions with harsh winters and heavy snowfalls have had to master the art of shoveling, plowing, and hauling in order to keep things moving; and more often than not, the winter wonderland of our fantasies turns into one giant, and very cold, hassle.

Two designers from Chicago are looking to change this. Natalya Egon and Noel Turgeon have proposed that cities select protected “plow-free” areas to have municipal snow-hauling vehicles transfer their loads to these zones. Rather than shoving it aside and letting it melt, people and machines would use the snow to create a little bit of that idealistic winter wonderland––mini mountains to climb and ski, flat mesas for urban views, and rolling dunes of snow.

Ideas from the proposal include:

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Wandering glaciers in Manhattan’s Washington Square Park.

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A kite-patrolled field of mounds in Moscow’s Red Square to get youngsters interested in snowboarding.

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Heavy vehicles could help create alpine landscapes throughout a city’s rooftops and streets.

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More proposed ideas for various snow structures.

This article can be found in its original form on Atlantic Cities

Photos: Center for Outdoor Living Design and Natalya Egon

GM Building

General Motors Building, Manhattan (Mario Tama/Getty Images via NPR)

Manhattan’s General Motors Building is a 50-story marble wonder, occupying a full city block at 5th Avenue and 59th Street. Considered one of the most valuable office towers in the United States, a large piece of the GM Building was purchased by a Chinese developer in May 2013––the latest example of how the U.S. real estate market is heating up for Asian investors.

From Park Avenue Plaza to the U.S. Bank Building, Asian investors are purchasing premier properties from New York to Los Angeles including office towers, luxury hotels, and high-street retail. According to Dan Fasulo, the managing director of Real Capital Analytics, foreign investment from Asian countries has totaled about $7 billion in 2013 so far, already almost doubling last year’s total of $4.3 billion.

For many, this surge is reminiscent of the late ’80’s, when Japanese investors made a succession of high-profile, inflated purchases from Rockefeller Center to Pebble Beach Golf Course, and were subsequently hit with big losses as the market crumbled soon after. But this new wave of investors have done their homework, says Christopher Ludeman, head of Global Capital Markets at CBRE Group.

The Chinese in particular do a tremendous amount of research and are careful investors, he says. This new wave is mindful of the Japanese experience but ultimately they are investors flush with cash who are ready to diversify––and the U.S. market is looking pretty good.

This article can be found in its original form at NPR.org