Archives For New York Times

A New York City architect got a special request from a client when he was asked to construct a custom modern chicken coop for their home in the Hamptons. It was a unique challenge, but he was up for it, and started pouring over DIY manuals on building, as he called them in The New York Times, “hippie how-to chicken coops.”

His goal was to translate high-design ideas in a way that they wouldn’t look out of place in the context of a farm, and we think he struck the perfect balance of rustic and glamorous, or “chicken chic.”

Source: The New York Times

Much like Hawaii’s Pumpkin Crunch or Oklahoma’s Sopapilla Casserole, we’ll keep this short and sweet. We love this interactive map from The New York Times that shows the most unusually popular food in each state, based on data from Google searches. The quirky names and flavor combinations are a reflection of the diverse cultures that came together to create the melting pot of America, and as much as we love our traditional dishes, we feel inspired to try something new this year.

So whether you’re sitting down to a plate of Spinach Maria in Tennessee, or heading to Idaho for some Frog Eye Salad, we hope you enjoy every bite.

Source: The New York Times

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In New Canaan, Connecticut stands a beautiful house with windows as walls. The Glass House is the most notable work of American Architect Philip Johnson who designed and built it along with many other structures in 1949. The house is a National Trust Historic Site preserved as an interpretation of modern architecture, landscape and art.

The Glass House is a little less than 1,800 square feet with a cylindrical brick service core housing a bathroom and hearth. The rest of the house is 360 degree views out the glass windows surrounding the exterior. Johnson chose the land and the location of the house because of his superstitions. He believed that by building his house on the shelf of a hill it would bring good spirits, as they will be intrigued by the hill. Johnson continued to build structures on his 49 acres of land as architectural essays. He even built a guest house, which he deliberately designed to be less than comfortable since he rarely had guests over and didn’t want them to stay more than a couple days. In 2005 Johnson passed away in his sleep at the Glass House. The house is open to visitors for tours around the entire property from May through November.

Sources: NY Times & The Philip Johnson Glass House