Archives For Oregon

We love Househappy’s home state of Oregon and we love Design*Sponge, so when we saw that they did a roundup of the state’s best homes, you can bet we were excited. Many of the homes that made the list are in Portland, too, so we’re definitely a little envious of these digs.

Source: Design*Sponge

Epic. That’s the only word to describe Coopers Hall, an urban taproom in Portland, Oregon.

Housed in a former auto garage, the 8,000-square-foot winery/taproom includes 44 wines—making it the most extensive on-tap wine program in the country, according to The Oregonian.

Coopers Hall is taking full advantage of the state’s recently-passed bill in the state that allows restaurants, wine shops, grocery stores and taprooms to sell on-tap wine to go in refillable bottles. The project was spearheaded by the same developer team that brought the Ace Hotel to downtown Portland. (Read more about it here.)

We can’t wait to belly up to the bar.

 

 

 

If you’ve ever visited Portland, Oregon, then you know how serious we are about coffee. With so many roasters, brewers, and baristas in this town, it takes a lot to impress.

Enter the Ratio Coffee Brewer. Mark Hellweg, founder of Clive Coffee, came up with the concept after listening to his customers complain about low-quality plastic machines. So he developed a design-forward coffee maker that marries the delicious results of a fussy pour-over with the one-button ease of a machine.

The aesthetic is warmly modern; die cast nickel-plated aluminum contrasts with Oregon black walnut and borosilicate glass. Though the machine isn’t inexpensive (retailing at $480), it’s built to last a lifetime.

The first batch of Ratio brewers sold out earlier this year and the second series is on sale now.

Images: © Clive Coffee

H/T: Remodelista

 

DesignSponge posted a sneak peek from one of our local favorites, Schoolhouse Electric.

 

Images: Schoolhouse Electric

It’s no secret that tiny homes have become one of the latest trends in housing and architecture. More frequently, people are finding that downsizing their space is not only more sustainable (and often cheaper), but it can also lead to a less-cluttered, easier existence.

But what do we sacrifice when we give up space? Will living in a tiny home leave us feeling constrained and claustrophobic? Last week, The New York Times featured a 704 square foot Oregon home that proves forfeiting space doesn’t have to feel small.

Lily Copenagle and Jamie Kennel of Portland, Oregon, had a few things in mind when imagining their perfect home: Kennel, who is 6″1, wanted to escape the low doorways and cramped rooms of the older houses they had previously occupied, and Copenagle dreamed of living in a home that wouldn’t take more than 5 minutes to vacuum. Their strategy became, “own less, live more.”

$135,000 later (including materials and labor), the result is a one-room home with a wood stove for heating, a green roof, a 550-gallon rain barrel, a huge backyard, and industrial touches throughout.

This article can be found in its original form at The New York Times.

Photos: Aaron Leitz via The New York Times

With the Winter Olympics coming up, you may be inspired to hit the slopes yourself. From the best après-ski hangouts to the prettiest peaks, here is Sunset’s list of best ski towns in the West.

Most relaxed: Rossland, British Columbia––Not a fan of the resorts? With only 112,000 visitors to the slope per year, Rossland manages to maintain that unaffected, small town charm.

Steamboat Springs, Colorado

Most Old West charm: Steamboat Springs, Colorado––Surrounded by 400 cattle ranches, skiers can mingle with the spur-clad locals.

Prettiest town: Telluride, Colorado––13,000 foot peaks and Bridal Veil Falls, what more could you ask for?

Most under the radar: Sandpoint, Idaho––In the panhandle between glacially formed Lake Pend Oreille and the Selkirk Mountains, Sandpoint has remained relatively unknown. Highlights include: MickDuff’s Brewing Co., Pend D’Oreille Winery tasting room, and Bistro Rouge Café.

Most food-focused: Bend, Oregon––There’s nothing better than a good meal after a long day of skiing, and this former logging town certainly delivers. Try the sandwiches from Jackson’s Corner; Spork, a cart that serves Thai curry and tacos; Zydecom for New Orlean’s flavors; 900 Wall, for a pasta/pizza/steak menu that truly delivers; and Joolz, an Oregonian take on Lebanese food.

Most charm: Crested Butte, Colorado––Expect to see anything from a hand painted bus to ski-toting bike riders.

Best après-ski scene: Jackson Hole, Wyoming––From the Mangy Moose to the Million Dollar Cowboy Bar, the locals in Jackson prove they are as hard-partying as they are hard-skiing.

Teton Village in Jackson Hole, Wyoming

Most well-rounded: Truckee, California––Just 13 miles north of Lake Tahoe, this ski town has something for everyone from cafés, to jazz lounges, to tasting rooms.

Easiest ski weekend: Park City, Utah––Just a quick plane flight away, Park City mixes small-town charm with a swanky celeb scene during Sundance Film Festival.

Best for non-skiers: Taos, New Mexico––Though the steep slopes atop a 9,207 foot base beckons experts, the town of Taos has everything for the non-skier from the 1,000-year-old Taos Pueblo, El Monte Sagrado’s spa, and an art museum.

This article can be found in its original form at Sunset

Photos: Red Mountain Resort, Brown Cannon III via Sunset, and Jackson Hole Mountain Resort

Among Americans who moved to a new state in 2013, the largest percentage moved to Oregon. According to their annual migration study, United Van Lines tracked 129,000 total moves in the U.S., while more than 61% of all interstate moves made in Oregon were inbound.

Washington D.C.––which held the top spot for the past 5 years––fell to fourth place, tying with South Dakota.

South Carolina came in second with 60% inbound, then North Carolina at 58%, and Nevada at 56%.

“Business incentives, industrial growth and relatively lower costs of living are attracting jobs and people to the Southeastern and Western states, such as South Dakota, Colorado, and Texas,” said UCLA economist Michael Stoll.

The lifestyle of the Pacific Northwest is also very attractive, Stoll points out. Public transportation, green spaces, and the local arts scene are among many reasons young professionals and retirees choose to move to this area of the country. Another reason, according to Stoll, is that Oregon is similar to California but with significantly lower home prices.

Source: CNN Money

Photo: Smarter Travel