Archives For Paint Color

Since 1990, Pantone has selected an official Color of the Year that they feel is representative of current trends and moods in design and culture. The organization just revealed that their selection for 2015 is Marsala: a deep red, named after marsala wine. The executive director of the Pantone Color Institute described the color as “a naturally robust and earthy wine red” that “enriches our mind, body and soul, exuding confidence and stability.”

Despite similar shades such as burgundy, aubergine, and oxblood trending in both decor and fashion recently, some are unhappy with the choice of Marsala as color of the year. Outlets such as New York Magazine and The Atlantic have expressed their displeasure with the selection. But as Slate reminds us, there’s no accounting for taste. We at Househappy happen to like it. Maybe not for a whole room, but for accents here and there. And its depth and warmth are especially appropriate during the cool winter months. What do you think? Will you be painting your walls or nails in Marsala anytime soon?

Source: Slate

Homebuyers know that finding the right property can sometimes feel like an overwhelming process with an incredible number of things to consider––location, square footage, number of rooms, backyard. And while we’ve already addressed the things you should check before buying a home, to make the process a little easier, here are 5 things NOT to worry about while house hunting:

1. Paint color––If your style is simple and classic, it can be difficult to envision yourself in a home with a purple kitchen; however, it’s important to remember that the color of the walls is one of the cheapest and easiest changes to make in a home.

2. Furniture/Style––Keep in mind that a home’s decor is only temporary and will be leaving with the previous owners. Do your best to imagine the home as a blank slate.

3. Architectural details (or lack thereof)––Does that wood paneling make you feel like you’re in a hunting lodge? Or have you always dreamed of crown molding? Though you might assume these details can make or break a property, they are actually quite easy to add or remove.

4. Light––Nothing is less home-y feeling than walking in to a dark, cave-like space; but before you dismiss a home completely, consider what small changes you could make to add some light. Are there trees or bushes blocking the windows? Are the windows too small for the room?

5. Current layout––Try to look past how the current owner is using a particular space and look at the bones of the room. Maybe you don’t throw a lot of dinner parties but could really use a family room––consider changing that dining room into your den. Or perhaps that extra bedroom would make a great home office.

This post can be found in its original form on Apartment Therapy

Photos: Househappy.org

From a 37-story apartment tower on Market Street to a 6-story condominium building in Dogpatch, it is clear that black is becoming one of the latest trends in San Francisco architecture.

“When a single black structure pops out from a corner or in the middle of a block, the contrast can give an energetic jolt to a familiar scene,” writes John King of the San Francisco Chronicle. “But as more owners and architects use dark cloaks to look sharp, there’s a very real danger that the eye-catching exception could spread across some districts like an oil spill.”

For many San Francisco residents, maintaining the aesthetics of a city “renowned for crisp light and soft fog” has long been a priority. In 1971, the Urban Design Plan stated that new buildings should “avoid extreme contrasts in color;” and the Downtown Plan of 1985 maintained that “disharmonious colors or building materials should be avoided. Buildings should be light in color.” But despite their best efforts, shades of onyx and charcoal are popping up on everything from downtown office buildings to single family homes in residential neighborhoods.

Even architects who have used the trend in their own designs are unsure of the long-term effects on the city’s over-all look.

“Old San Francisco is a white Mediterranean city,” said Stanley Saitowitz, the architect responsible for a new 6-story condominium on 20th St. painted a rich charcoal. “Black’s definitely the new color, but my feeling now is that it really doesn’t fit too well with the light.”

Like most trends, the feeling seems to be: “less is more.” In context, black paint can highlight a building’s structure or provide necessary visual balance to a bold neighboring edifice; however, if black continues to be in vogue, many people fear that the trend is in danger of changing the face of San Francisco as we know it.

This article can be found in its original form at SFGate.

Images: San Francisco Chronicle

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Studies show that right environment can make a big difference in productivity, and companies generally keep this in mind when designing their employees’ workspace. Mashable recently published a list of design tips for a more productive office; which has us wondering: Why not apply some of these same recommendations when designing our offices at home?

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1. Ergonomics. 

The logic is simple––if you’re back is killing you or your neck is stiff, you’re not going to get much work done. Fortunately, the fix is equally simple: adjust. Focus on the height of your chair and desk, and the angle of your computer monitor.

2. Lose the clutter. 

Clean, clutter-free workspaces can increase productivity––plus you will spend less time searching for things if you’re organized. Consider developing a filing system for both hard copies and digital documents. And always, always back up your work.

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3. Add some color. 

According to color psychologist Angela Wright, certain colors tend to have the same universal effect on people. Blue stimulates the mind, yellow inspires creativity, red affects your body, and green creates calming balance. Don’t forget to pay attention to the intensity of your color choice: highly saturated, bright colors will stimulate while softer, muted colors are soothing.

4. Get one with nature. 

Two recent studies have found that having a plant at your desk or near your workspace can increase cognitive attention and productivity––not to mention make your air more breathable!

5. Light it up. 

A well lit space can do wonders for how well you work. Natural light from windows and skylights is ideal; however, if this isn’t an option in your space, opt for indirect light rather than overhead.

Source: Mashable

Photos: Adorable Home, Houzz