Archives For Productivity

You get to work in the morning, open your inbox, and there it is…. hundreds of unread emails.

If this sounds familiar, you’re not alone. In a world where communication––whether long distance or from an office down the hall––is essentially free, we have become inundated with messages with no way to stop it.

According to a recent study by technology and market research firm Radicati Group, people around the world send up to 182 billion emails everyday and 67 trillion emails a year, and this number is only growing. The number of active email accounts grew from 3.3 billion in 2012 to 3.9 billion last year, and is expected to grow by 6% in each of the next four years.

What was invented as a convenience has gradually become an impediment or distraction. In fact, Clive Thompson, author of “Smarter Than You Think: How Technology is Changing Our Minds for the Better,” believes that email has actually become a barrier to productivity and efficiency in the workplace.

“You make it easy for people to do something, they will do more of it,” Thompson said. “People feel the need to include 10 other people on an email just to let them know they are being productive at work. But as a result, it ends up making those other 10 people unproductive because they have to manage that email.”

While many startups including Mailbox, Xobni, and Sparrow, have invented various smart-mailboxes in an attempt to solve this issue, many are considering a more extreme option to resolve their over-emailed existence––declare email bankruptcy. Simply select all and hit delete.

Is email still your primary form of communication at work? How do you deal when your inbox begins to pile up?

This article can be found in its original form on The New York Times

Image: Shutterstock

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Studies show that right environment can make a big difference in productivity, and companies generally keep this in mind when designing their employees’ workspace. Mashable recently published a list of design tips for a more productive office; which has us wondering: Why not apply some of these same recommendations when designing our offices at home?

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1. Ergonomics. 

The logic is simple––if you’re back is killing you or your neck is stiff, you’re not going to get much work done. Fortunately, the fix is equally simple: adjust. Focus on the height of your chair and desk, and the angle of your computer monitor.

2. Lose the clutter. 

Clean, clutter-free workspaces can increase productivity––plus you will spend less time searching for things if you’re organized. Consider developing a filing system for both hard copies and digital documents. And always, always back up your work.

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3. Add some color. 

According to color psychologist Angela Wright, certain colors tend to have the same universal effect on people. Blue stimulates the mind, yellow inspires creativity, red affects your body, and green creates calming balance. Don’t forget to pay attention to the intensity of your color choice: highly saturated, bright colors will stimulate while softer, muted colors are soothing.

4. Get one with nature. 

Two recent studies have found that having a plant at your desk or near your workspace can increase cognitive attention and productivity––not to mention make your air more breathable!

5. Light it up. 

A well lit space can do wonders for how well you work. Natural light from windows and skylights is ideal; however, if this isn’t an option in your space, opt for indirect light rather than overhead.

Source: Mashable

Photos: Adorable Home, Houzz