Archives For Technology

Whether you’re searching for a home for yourself or a client, Househappy has everything you need to find the perfect property for you.

Nothing is worse than running out of battery on the go. It seems like new tech innovations are released every day to combat this all-too-common issue. Starbucks even announced recently that it has begun to introduce mobile device charging mats to some San Francisco-area locations to give patrons a phone fix while fueling up with caffeine. But every once and awhile we hear about a mobile-related invention that sounds special. This is the case for the Mini Power, a tiny, one-time-use, recyclable phone charger. Created by designer Tsung Chih-Hsien, this award-winning device is expected to revolutionize the mobile charging industry, bringing more sustainable single-use chargers to the market. We hope so!

Source: Fast Company

The Millennial generation (those born between 1980 and 2000) is currently the second largest segment of homebuyers behind Generation X. As this group is only expected to grow, it is important to understand the different wants and expectations of younger buyers.

Here are 6 home “must-haves” of homebuyers under 35:

1. Updated kitchen and bath. The majority of Millennials are looking for updated kitchen and bathrooms because they simply cannot afford remodeling. “Most of their savings will go toward the down payment and furnishings,” explains Jack Curtis, a real estate professional in Dublin, Ohio.

2. Big kitchen, open floorplan. The kitchen is the center of the home and seen as a hang out place for many young buyers. In addition, Curtis says that “today’s young buyers are also more attracted to an open floor plan, rather than a layout that compartmentalizes the home”.

3. Home office. Due to advances in technology, many Millennials now have the option of working from home making home offices more appealing.

4. Location. Younger buyers tend to see location differently from their parents, says Chicago real estate broker Allison Nichols; “My younger buyers look for properties that are in proximity to public transportation and that have a good walking score.”

5. Low maintenance. According to broker Lou Cardillo, “Younger homebuyers prefer low upkeep features in their homes such as hardwood floors and granite countertops because they are attractive and hassle-free.”

6. Online photos. Younger buyers tend to start their searches online, which makes good quality photos more important than ever. According to the National Association of Realtors, 90% of buyers use the internet to search for homes.

The article can be found in its original form on ABC News.

Photo: Homedit

Placemeter Algorithms Output from Placemeter on Vimeo.

This startup is extracting measurable data from live video streams to help you avoid waiting in those long New York City lines. Placemeter’s vision technology is able to count the pedestrians, calculate how heavy traffic is, and determine what is happening at any given location; this data is then used to approximate wait times to give users the power of knowing what a place is like before they arrive.

Placemeter relies primarily on New York traffic cams; however, to maximize the accuracy of their information, they have created an app for users to contribute data. On their site, the company encourages people to dig out their old, unused smartphones, download the Placemeter app, and place the phone in their window, adding one more camera feed to the Placemeter data collection.

“With every new camera added to our system, we can provide more accurate information about more places,” the company says.

In addition to avoiding that long line at your favorite coffee cart, this real-time pedestrian data is extremely valuable to city planners and business owners.

Source: Placemeter, TechCrunch

Video: Placemeter

The United Nations projects that by 2050, there will be 9.2 billion humans on earth. To solve the impending predicament of where we are going to house all those people, USC professor Behrokh Khoshnevis has come up with the concept for a massive 3D printer capable of creating an entire 2,500 square foot home––in just 24 hours.

Professor Khoshnevis designed a printer with two crane-like arms and a crossbeam to hold a printhead that dispenses super quick drying cement. Though the printer could create the structure of a home, construction workers would still be needed to prep the space, lay down foundation, install window head jambs, and insert a metal ceiling between the floors, along with other finishing touches.

Can you imagine building your dream home in a single day?

Source: Dvice

Image: Dvice

From established businesses like Google and Facebook to young startups like Househappy, the tech industry has built a reputation for being a fun, lucrative, and increasingly coveted career choice for young professionals. Fortunately, the tech industry also has a high demand for labor. In fact, according to US News & World Report, the tech industry is expected to be one of the fastest growing fields between 2012 and 2022; however, despite already high employment numbers, there are certainly established hubs within the industry. If you’re looking for a high paying tech job, you may want to consider moving to one of these top 10 tech towns:

1. Silicon Valley, California (Includes Cupertino, Fremont, Mountain View, Menlo Park, Palo Alto, Redwood City, San Jose, San Mateo, San Ramon, Santa Clara, Sunnyvale, San Francisco, Oakland, Berkeley.)
Average salary: $109,000, up 7% in last year

2. Baltimore, Maryland/ Washington, D.C.
Average salary: $98,000, up 0% in last year

3. Los Angeles, California
Average salary: $96,000, up 4% in last year

4. Seattle, Washington
Average salary: $95,000, up 1% in last year

5. Boston, Massachusetts 
Average salary: $95,000, up 0% in last year

6. New York, New York
Average salary: $94,000, up 5% in last year

7. Denver, Colorado
Average salary: $93,000, up 3% in last year

8. Houston, Texas
Average salary: $92,000, down 2% in last year

9. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Average salary: $92,000, up 8% in last year

10. Austin, Texas
Average salary: $92,000, up 3% in last year

Source: Forbes

Image: Househappy.org

For years now, rumors of an Apple-made watch have been floating around the internet. Ever since 2008 when Steve Wozniak “let slip” that company’s future could lie in an iWatch, technology and design enthusiasts have continued to speculate about how such a product might look and function.

Last week, front-end developer and UI designer Todd Hamilton threw his own version into the mix; The design, which largely resembles a marriage between a Nike Fuelband and an iPhone, is based on a mock-up by Thomas Bogner.

“It was an impressive concept that got a lot of people excited including myself,” Hamilton says on his personal blog. “However, it had a major flaw: the orientation of the interface made it impossible to use…I decided to take a stab at the problem and create a more user friendly concept. I wanted to retain a slim form factor like the Fuelband and incorporate familiar UI components from iOS 7. It needed to feel natural on the wrist and look like something Apple would actually produce.”

Hamilton’s version is a simple band with a curved touchscreen display, a single home button on the left, and volume control on the right. The lock screen is a black and white interface displaying the time, date, and button to activate Siri. Possible actions largely mimic that of the iPhone––tap to use Siri, swipe up to unlock, or pull down to view notifications.

“While I was designing this I found myself pretending what it would be like to use swiping gestures on my wrist,” he writes, encouraging readers to do the same to get a feel for how the product would feel to use.

The homescreen (or springboard) has four app icons vertically stacked with a page controller on the right. Users would swipe up or down to move between pages and press the home button to return to the lockscreen.

Hamilton’s comprehensive mock-up also includes his ideas for a health and fitness app (think Jawbone, Fitbit, and Nike Fuel), along with his thoughts on how the iWatch will get its data (“tethered to the iPhone over Bluetooth, providing a data connection through your existing plan”); however, the most interesting part of his design is probably the animated “use case” which walks you through the hypothetical Phone app and gives a real sense of how the product might actually look and feel as you were using it:

iWatch Concept from Todd Hamilton on Vimeo.

What do you think of his design? Would you make any changes or are you already sold on Hamilton’s iWatch?

For more information on Todd Hamilton or to view his original post visit ToddHam.com

Images: Todd Hamilton