Archives For United States

 

How happy is your state?

Each year the Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index measures the well-being of all 50 states. This year, for the first time, North Dakota jumped to the top, scoring the highest in work environment and physical health.

  1. North Dakota
  2. South Dakota
  3. Nebraska
  4. Minnesota
  5. Montana
  6. Vermont
  7. Colorado
  8. Hawaii
  9. Washington
  10. Iowa

Source: Gallup

 

Are you tired of living in big cities with unaffordable housing options? If so, you may want to consider purchasing real estate in one of these 10 most affordable small cities in the United States:

Kokomo, Indiana
Population: 82,849
Median home price: $85,000
Median income: $60,100
Percent of homes sold that are affordable: 96.3%

Springfield, Ohio
Population: 137,206
Median home price: $76,000
Median income: $53,500
Percent of homes sold that are affordable: 93.3%

Monroe, Michigan
Population: 151,048
Median home price: $120,000
Median income: $63,700
Percent of homes sold that are affordable: 93.2%

Vineland, New Jersey
Population: 157,785
Median home price: $131,000
Median income: $68,600
Percent of homes sold that are affordable: 93.2%

Cumberland, Maryland
Population: 101,968
Median home price: $89,000
Median income: $53,300
Percent of homes sold that are affordable: 92.9%

Davenport, Iowa
Population: 382,630
Median home price: $94,000
Median income: $63,100
Percent of homes sold that are affordable: 92.5%

Lima, Ohio
Population: 105,141
Median home price: $85,000
Median income: $54,200
Percent of homes sold that are affordable: 92.5%

Bay City, Michigan
Population: 106,935
Median home price: $75,000
Median income: $56,100
Percent of homes sold that are affordable: 92.1%

Fairbanks, Alaska
Population: 100,272
Median home price: $205,000
Median income: $78,400
Percent of homes sold that are affordable: 92%

Mansfield, Ohio
Population: 122,673
Median home price: $91,000
Median income: $54,600
Percent of homes sold that are affordable: 91%

This article can be found in its original form on CNN Money.

Photo: Springfield, Ohio via Rob Hatfield/Greater Springfield GVB

If you’re looking to move to a city with a low unemployment rate and higher median salary, you may want to consider one of these 20 locations!

Every year, Forbes publishes a list of the 20 fastest growing cities in the U.S. The list is based on the 100 most populous Metropolitan Statistical Areas in the country and rated by six metrics including estimated rates of population growth, year-over-year job growth, and economic growth.

  1. Austin, Texas
  2. Raleigh, North Carolina
  3. Phoenix, Arizona
  4. Dallas, Texas
  5. Salt Lake City, Utah
  6. Denver, Colorado
  7. Ogden, Utah
  8. Charlotte, North Carolina
  9. Orlando, Florida
  10. Houston, Texas
  11. Seattle, Washington
  12. Atlanta, Georgia
  13. Provo, Utah
  14. Cape Coral, Florida
  15. Palm Bay, Florida
  16. Boise, Idaho
  17. Minneapolis, Minnesota
  18. North Port, Florida
  19. San Jose, California
  20. San Antonio, Texas

This article can be found in its original form on Forbes.

Photos: Homes for sale via Househappy.org

walkable

Nationally, only a small percentage of people walk to work each day; however, cities and towns across the United States are continuing to push policies and planning initiatives aimed at making their communities more walkable.

According to the latest census data, residents walking to work accounted for the highest share of commuters last year in the following list of cities with populations over 100,00. Here are the top 10:

  1. Cambridge, Massachusetts
  2. Columbia, South Carolina
  3. Berkeley, California
  4. Ann Arbor, Michigan
  5. Boston, Massachusetts
  6. Provo, Utah
  7. Washington, DC
  8. New Haven, Connecticut
  9. Syracuse, New York
  10. Providence, Rhode Island

Source: Governing

Photo: Wikimedia Commons via Governing

Among Americans who moved to a new state in 2013, the largest percentage moved to Oregon. According to their annual migration study, United Van Lines tracked 129,000 total moves in the U.S., while more than 61% of all interstate moves made in Oregon were inbound.

Washington D.C.––which held the top spot for the past 5 years––fell to fourth place, tying with South Dakota.

South Carolina came in second with 60% inbound, then North Carolina at 58%, and Nevada at 56%.

“Business incentives, industrial growth and relatively lower costs of living are attracting jobs and people to the Southeastern and Western states, such as South Dakota, Colorado, and Texas,” said UCLA economist Michael Stoll.

The lifestyle of the Pacific Northwest is also very attractive, Stoll points out. Public transportation, green spaces, and the local arts scene are among many reasons young professionals and retirees choose to move to this area of the country. Another reason, according to Stoll, is that Oregon is similar to California but with significantly lower home prices.

Source: CNN Money

Photo: Smarter Travel

Last week, national moving company Atlas Van Lines published their annual review of Household Moving Migration Patterns in the United States and Canada. By tallying up all the moves (both inbound and outbound) they performed in each state and compiling the data into a handy infographic, they have provided us with a snapshot of where people were moving from and to in 2013.

Interestingly, only nine states/provinces saw a higher percentage (over 55%) of inbound traffic than outbound, making them the locations most likely to have increased in population in the last year:

  • Oregon
  • Idaho
  • Montana
  • North Dakota
  • Texas
  • Tennessee
  • North Carolina
  • New Hampshire
  • Newfoundland

(The list above appears in no particular order). 

In less surprising news, California retained the title of State With the Highest Total Number of Moves––a distinction they have held for the past ten years.

Check it out:

2013-migration-patterns-940

This infographic originally appeared on AEIdeas and Business Insider

Did you know it is 5x more expensive to rent a one-bedroom apartment in San Francisco than it is in Cleveland?

This map from Priceonomics shows the rent prices in 50 of the most populous cities in the US. The results probably won’t surprise you:

Top 10 Most Expensive Cities to Rent 

  1. San Fransisco – $2,850
  2. New York – $2,700
  3. Washington DC – $1,900
  4. San Jose – $1,832
  5. Boston – $1,730
  6. Chicago – $1,500
  7. Miami – $1,500
  8. Seattle – $1,445
  9. Los Angeles – $1,395
  10. Oakland – $1,375

Want to know where you can get the most bang for your buck? Check out Priceonomics to see the complete results and use the interactive map.